Explore Our Stowe Guidebook!

Hidden Gems in You Won’t Find in a Stowe Guidebook

12/03/2018 | by bizcor | Blogs

From the great outdoors to spooky encounters, there’s no shortage of hidden gems to visit when you decide to stay in Stowe! If you’re looking for something a little different to see on your next vacation and want activities you won’t be able to find in any Stowe guidebook here are a few places to start:

Hike the Bingham Falls Trail

There are a number of incredible hiking trails for you to experience here in Stowe, but if you’re looking for one that’s off the beaten path that provides breathtaking views unlike any other then I would highly recommend visiting Bingham Falls. This half mile trail is rated to be suitable for hikers of all skill levels, and as long as they’re on a leash your furry friends are more than welcome to come along as well! Though short, this hiking path will reward you of breathtaking views of the Bingham Falls itself and will be well worth the experience!

Smugglers Notch Road, Rt 108 (7 miles north from Stowe Village on Route 108)

One of the most popular winter hikes for local and visitors is the closed section of Route 108, known simply as “The Notch”.  The famous Smugglers Notch is a narrow pass through the Mount Mansfield and Spruce Peak (Stowe Mountain Resort and Smugglers Notch Resort). Lined with 1,000-foot cliffs, the winding road is closed to cars in winter, but open to hikers of all abilities.  Park at the lot just past the entrance to Stowe Mountain Resort and proceed around the closed gate. The road is packed down by snowmobiles providing a packed trail to walk on, but snowshoes and cross-country skis are popular modes of transportation. The road starts out with a gentle incline for approximately 1.25 miles and then begins to get a bit steeper as it starts winding through the upper parts of The Notch Road. If you are not a dog-lover, this is not a hike for you as most hikers bring their canine friends along for some exercise!  The hike is a breathtaking experience – the notch is truly spectacular! It’s somewhere you probably won’t find in any Stowe guidebook!

Visit Emily’s Bridge

Are you someone that enjoys a good ol’ fashioned ghost story? Then you’ll definitely want to check out Emily’s Bridge here in Stowe, as not many guide books will tell you the truth about this bridge! Originally known as the Gold Brook Bridge, its history took a dark and mysterious turn in the mid-1800s. A young woman by the name of Emily was supposed to meet her lover to elope at the bridge, but when he failed to show she decided to hang herself from the rafter of that bridge. Since that day, there have been tales of claw marks on the sides of passing cards and scratches down the back of pedestrian crossers… all because it’s believed Emily’s ghost still haunts the bridge. If you’re someone who loves ghost stories this is one gem you’ll need to visit!

The Ben & Jerry’s Flavor Graveyard

The beloved ice cream makers, Ben & Jerry’s, have been pumping out some of our favorite flavors of ice cream since 1978. While some, such as Cherry Garcia, have been huge hits in the past, others… have been less successful. This is why I would highly recommend taking a short trip south to Ben & Jerry’s Flavor Graveyard, which is decorated with headstones for all of the flavors that haven’t quite made the cut. From Makin’ Whoopie Pie to Dastardly Mash (which had raisins?) and everything in between, this is truly a one of a kind gem that needs to be seen to be believed.

Book a Stay To Explore Our Stowe Guidebook

So while you’re contemplating which hidden gem to visit in Stowe first, make sure to get your vacation started off on the right foot by reserving your spot at one of Stowe Country Homes beautiful rental homes or cabins. We have a number of amazing properties located all throughout the Stowe area, and we’re confidence we’ll have the perfect home to fit your needs. So don’t hesitate – contact us with any questions or to make your reservation today!

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